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When driving on Mississippi roads, most people want to stay safe. A big danger to yourself and other drivers is drowsy driving. In 2017, 795 people died because of drowsy driving. The NHTSA calls drowsy driving entirely preventable.

Often, people feel stretched too thin. Between work, children and other obligations, sleep might not be a priority. The problem is that with all of these obligations, people still consider themselves fit to be behind the wheel. To understand drowsy driving and the risks that you may be taking, it helps to know what most drowsy accidents have in common.

Three common factors contribute to drowsy driving accidents. The first is the time that a person drives. If you are on the road between midnight and six in the morning, then you are out when you may normally experience a dip in your circadian rhythm. This is your internal clock attempting to regulate your sleep. When it comes to your internal clock, you do not want to fight it.

The second thing that most drowsy driving accidents have in common is that it involves one driver. This is because you may fall asleep at the wheel and drive off the road. When you are asleep, you will not brake. Instead, you will retain a solid speed until you either wake up or collide with an object.

Most accidents also occur in rural areas or freeways. On these roads, it is very easy to lose track of time and to feel hypnotized by the road. This is particularly true when combined with late night driving.